Microsurgery & Complex Reconstruction

Microsurgery & Complex Reconstruction

Reconstructive microsurgery typically refers to surgical procedures that join together blood vessels under a microscope. These complex reconstructive techniques are used to reconstruct areas affected by major trauma, cancers or other processes where healthy tissue needs to be added to a different region of the body.  They may also be indicated in revision procedures, particularly in tertiary or quaternary revisions where the local tissue has been rendered unsalvageable.

This involves a flap: tissue with a blood supply taken from one part of the body which is then used to reconstruct the affected area. Surgeries involving flaps where the blood vessels must be fully disconnected then reconnected after transplantation elsewhere are microsurgical free flaps, because arteries, veins and sometimes nerves need to be delicately connected together under a microscope. This process is called “anastomosis”. 

Microsurgical treatment plans may involve one or multiple stages.  Medical history and other factors may need to be considered when discussing your options with your surgeon. 

In certain cases Dr. Coon will request pre-operative imaging to confirm the viability and location of blood vessels, including small perforating vessels. Technology like virtual surgical planning and 3D vascular reconstruction mapping may be used to plan an individualized and precise surgical plan, which can minimize surgical time and produce the desired result with greater precision than can be achieved otherwise.